A Dangerous Man by Connie Brockway

By Connie Brockway

"**In this spellbinding novel, Connie Brockway dazzles together with her penetrating insights into the most unlikely goals and darkish wishes of the human heart.**

Mercy Coltrane, a brash younger American lady, has arrived in England to look for her lacking brother. keen to possibility whatever in her quest, she seeks out assistance from Hart Moreland, the mercenary her father enlisted years in the past to guard his land—when Hart used to be often called Duke the Gunslinger.

Now Earl of Perth in his local England, Hart has became his again on his prior with a view to in achieving a well-merited place of admire and gear, and the very last thing he wishes is a reminder of his violent historical past. yet Mercy proves to be even more than simply a painful remnant of the realm he left at the back of. vivid, witty, and gorgeous, she embodies the prospect for happiness that Hart desperately craves.

**Includes a unique message from the editor, in addition to excerpts from different Loveswept titles.**

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Men. Epitr. 303–305. See also Arist. Phgn. 806a15 where ‘γνωρίσματα’ are the signs through which we can identify a certain state of someone’s soul and body. See Hurst 1990; see also Scafuro 1997, pp. 156–162. degrees of understanding 27 Πελίαν τ’ ἐκείνους εὗρε πρεσβύτης ἀνὴρ αἰπόλος, ἔχων οἵαν ἐγὼ νῦν διφθέραν, ὡς δ’ ἤισθετ’ αὐτοὺς ὄντας αὑτοῦ κρείττονας, λέγει τὸ πρᾶγμ’, ὡς εὗρεν, ὡς ἀνείλετο. ἔδωκε δ’ αὐτοῖς πηρίδιον γνωρισμάτων, ἐξ οὗ μαθόντες πάντα τὰ καθ’ αὑτοὺς σαφῶς ἐγένοντο βασιλεῖς οἱ τότ’ ὄντες αἰπόλοι.

9. See also Gutzwiller 2000, p. 133 for a more general treatment of this topic. For further reflections on this arbitration scene and Smikrines’ character in Epitrepontes see Iversen 1998, especially pp. 121–153. Men. Epitr. 366–369. 28 chapter 2 anticipate consequences that the author will frustrate in the short term15 and to focus the audience’s attention on tokens of recognition that, at this moment, are not bringing about the recognition they are meant to enable. In the second scene of Act Two, we are once again close to the discovery of the identity of the foundling.

Poet. 5, 1449a32–37. For a recent and more detailed discussion of the shameful in comedy see Munteanu 2011(a), chapter 4. In this respect, Menander’s comedy can be classified as falling within Northrop Frye’s fourth kind of fictional mode: “If superior neither to other men nor to his environment, the hero is one of us: we respond to a sense of his common humanity, and demand from the poet the same canons of probability that we find in our own experience. This gives us the hero of the low mimetic mode, of most comedy and of realistic fiction” (Frye 1957, p.

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