A Kiss at Midnight (Fairy Tales, Book 1) by Eloisa James

By Eloisa James

"Miss Kate Daltry doesn't think in fairy stories . . . or fortunately ever after.

Forced by way of her stepmother to wait a ball, Kate meets a prince . . . and makes a decision he's something yet fascinating. A conflict of wits and wills ensues, yet they either comprehend their impossible to resist appeal will lead nowhere. For Gabriel is promised to a different woman—a princess whose hand in marriage will satisfy his ruthless objectives.

Gabriel *likes* his fiancée, that is a welcome flip of occasions, yet he doesn't *love* her. evidently, he can be *wooing* his bride-to-be, now not the witty, impoverished good looks who refuses to fawn over him.

Godmothers and glass slippers although, this can be one fairy story during which future conspires to damage any likelihood that Kate and Gabriel may need a fortunately ever after.

Unless a prince throws away every thing that makes him noble . . .

Unless a dowry of an unruly center trumps a fortune . . .

Unless one kiss on the stroke of dead night alterations everything.
"

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Extra resources for A Kiss at Midnight (Fairy Tales, Book 1)

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Men. Epitr. 303–305. See also Arist. Phgn. 806a15 where ‘γνωρίσματα’ are the signs through which we can identify a certain state of someone’s soul and body. See Hurst 1990; see also Scafuro 1997, pp. 156–162. degrees of understanding 27 Πελίαν τ’ ἐκείνους εὗρε πρεσβύτης ἀνὴρ αἰπόλος, ἔχων οἵαν ἐγὼ νῦν διφθέραν, ὡς δ’ ἤισθετ’ αὐτοὺς ὄντας αὑτοῦ κρείττονας, λέγει τὸ πρᾶγμ’, ὡς εὗρεν, ὡς ἀνείλετο. ἔδωκε δ’ αὐτοῖς πηρίδιον γνωρισμάτων, ἐξ οὗ μαθόντες πάντα τὰ καθ’ αὑτοὺς σαφῶς ἐγένοντο βασιλεῖς οἱ τότ’ ὄντες αἰπόλοι.

9. See also Gutzwiller 2000, p. 133 for a more general treatment of this topic. For further reflections on this arbitration scene and Smikrines’ character in Epitrepontes see Iversen 1998, especially pp. 121–153. Men. Epitr. 366–369. 28 chapter 2 anticipate consequences that the author will frustrate in the short term15 and to focus the audience’s attention on tokens of recognition that, at this moment, are not bringing about the recognition they are meant to enable. In the second scene of Act Two, we are once again close to the discovery of the identity of the foundling.

Poet. 5, 1449a32–37. For a recent and more detailed discussion of the shameful in comedy see Munteanu 2011(a), chapter 4. In this respect, Menander’s comedy can be classified as falling within Northrop Frye’s fourth kind of fictional mode: “If superior neither to other men nor to his environment, the hero is one of us: we respond to a sense of his common humanity, and demand from the poet the same canons of probability that we find in our own experience. This gives us the hero of the low mimetic mode, of most comedy and of realistic fiction” (Frye 1957, p.

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